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Introduction:

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Conclusion:

Directions: The point of this assignment is to build your document analysis skills. Using the question below, formulate a thesis statement that fully answers the question. Then, fill in the rest of the chart using evidence from the documents below. In the first column, place evidence from each document that you would use to support your thesis statement. In the second column, explain your rationale for selecting the evidence.

1. Explain the causes of the rise of tensions between the American colonists and the British government in the period 1754-1776.

Thesis: The causes of the rise of tensions between the American colonists and the British prior to the American Revolution are social strife, harsh taxes placed on colonists, and the end of salutary neglect.

Evidence: (Copy and paste the evidence you would use to support your thesis from the documents in this column)

Rationale: How does this piece of evidence support your thesis? (It proves my thesis because……)

Document 1

When I go to see the English commander and say to him that some of our comrades are dead, instead of bewailing their death, as our French brothers do, he laughs at me and at you.

This proves my thesis because it shows that the British were less favorable to the Native Americans than the French, which would lead to increased conflict between these groups.

Document 2

“Near the CourtHouse, they made a large Bonfire with a Number of Tar Barrels, &c. and committed it to the Flames.”

This proves my thesis by showing the colonist were using harsh materials but weren’t hurting anyone

Document 3

adequate provision for defraying the charge of the administration of justice, and the support of civil government, in such provinces where it shall be found necessary; and towards further defraying the expenses of defending, protecting, and securing, the said dominions

This proves my evidence by stating the government wanted the civilian to pay for the damages of war without them rebeling

Document 4

They immediately surrounded the sentry posted there, and with clubs and other weapons threatened to execute their vengeance on him

This proves my thesis because The Colonist were very angry with the way they were being governed so they are being very aggressive with the soldiers to get to the head

Document 5

The image shows British soldiers firing on

unarmed American colonists.

This proves my thesis

because it shows that the

Colonial press was Dushing

propaganda in order lo sway

more colonial opinions

towards revolution.

Document 6

lang received intelligence, that a quantity of

Ammunition, Provisions Artllery Tents and

small Arms have been collected in Concoro.

for the Avowed Purpose of a sing and

supporting a Rebellion against his Majesty

This evidence proves my

Chosen because it snows a

dramatic shift in how the

colon sis responded to British

phonty Instead of

Protesting they are now

raising a militia and Stockpiling weapons to fight

against the British

Document 7

List Multiple causes for the colonist rebelling against their own government and their aggressive behavior

For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:

Document 1

“It is important for us, my brothers, that we exterminate from our lands this nation which seeks only to destroy us. You see as well as I do that we can no longer supply our needs, as we have done from our brothers, the French. The English sell us goods twice as dear as the French do and their goods do not last. Scarcely have we bought a blanket or something else to cover ourselves with before we must think of getting another; and when we wish to set out for our winter camp, they do not want to give us any credit as our brothers the French do.

When I go to see the English commander and say to him that some of our comrades are dead, instead of bewailing their death, as our French brothers do, he laughs at me and at you. If I ask for anything for our sick, he refuses with the reply that he has no use for us. From all this you can well see that they are seeking our ruin. Therefore, my brothers, we must all swear their destruction and wait no longer.”

-Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa tribe addressing a gathering of Ottawa, Huron, and Potawatomie Indians, May 5, 1763

Document 2

“On Saturday the 19th of last Month, about Seven of the Clock in the Evening, near Five Hundred People assembled together in this Town, and exhibited the Effigy* of a certain Honorable Gentleman; and after letting it hang by the Neck for some Time, near the Court House, they made a large Bonfire with a Number of Tar Barrels, &c. and committed it to the Flames.—The Reason assigned for the People’s Dislike to that Gentleman, was, from being informed of his having several Times expressed himself much in Favour of the STAMP-DUTY….

And, On Thursday, 31st of the same Month, in the Evening, a great Number of People again assembled, and produced an Effigy of Liberty, which they put into a Coffin, and marched in solemn Procession with it to the Church-Yard, a Drum in Mourning beating before them, and the Town Bell, muffled, ringing a doleful Knell at the same Time:—But before they committed the Body to the Ground, they thought it advisable to feel its Pulse; and when finding some Remains of Life, they returned back to a Bonfire ready prepared, placed the Effigy before it in a large Two-arm’d Chair, and concluded the Evening with great Rejoicings, on finding that LIBERTY had still an Existence in the Colonies.”

* a roughly made model of a particular person, made in order to be damaged or destroyed as a protest or expression of anger

-From the North Carolina Gazette, November 20, 1765

Document 3

“WHEREAS it is expedient that a revenue should be raised in your Majesty’s dominions in America, for making a more certain and adequate provision for defraying the charge of the administration of justice, and the support of civil government, in such provinces where it shall be found necessary; and towards further defraying the expenses of defending, protecting, and securing, the said dominions; we, your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the commons of Great Britain, in parliament assembled, have therefore resolved to give and grant unto your Majesty the several rates and duties herein after mentioned….

For every hundred weight of crown, plate, flint, and white glass, four shillings and eight pence.

For every hundred weight of green glass, one shilling and two pence.

For every hundred weight of red lead, two shillings.

For every hundred weight of painters colours, two shillings.

For every pound weight avoirdupois of tea, three pence.

For every ream of paper, usually called or known by the name of Atlas Fine, twelve shillings. “

-British Parliament, An Act for Granting Certain Duties in the British Colonies and Plantations in America, November 20, 1767

Document 4

“On Monday night about 8 o’clock two soldiers were attacked and beat. But the party of the townspeople in order to carry matters to the utmost length, broke into two meeting houses and rang the alarm bells, which I supposed was for fire as usual, but was soon undeceived. About 9 some of the guard came to and informed me the town inhabitants were assembling to attack the troops, and that the bells were ringing as the signal for that purpose and not for fire, and the beacon intended to be fired to bring in the distant people of the country. This, as I was captain of the day, occasioned my repairing immediately to the main guard. In my way there I saw the people in great commotion, and heard them use the most cruel and horrid threats against the troops. In a few minutes after I reached the guard, about 100 people passed it and went towards the custom house where the king’s money is lodged. They immediately surrounded the sentry posted there, and with clubs and other weapons threatened to execute their vengeance on him. I was soon informed by a townsman their intention was to carry off the soldier from his post and probably murder him.”

-Statement by Captain Thomas Preston, British Officer, March 1770

Document 5


Engraving by Paul Revere, March 1770

Document 6

“Having received intelligence, that a quantity of Ammunition, Provisions, Artillery, Tents and small Arms, have been collected at Concord, for the Avowed Purpose of raising and supporting a Rebellion against His Majesty, you will March with a Corps of Grenadiers and Light Infantry, put under your Command, with the utmost expedition and Secrecy to Concord, where you will seize and distroy all Artillery, Ammunition, Provisions, Tents, Small Arms, and all Military Stores whatever. But you will take care that the Soldiers do not plunder the Inhabitants, or hurt private property.

You have a Draught of Concord, on which is marked the Houses, Barns, &c, which contain the above military Stores… The Powder and flower must be shook out of the Barrels into the River, the Tents burnt, Pork or Beef destroyed in the best way you can devise. And the Men may put Balls of lead in their pockets, throwing them by degrees into Ponds, Ditches &c., but no Quantity together, so that they may be recovered afterwards. If you meet any Brass Artillery, you will order their muzzles to be beat in so as to render them useless.”

-Gen. Thomas Gage, Orders to Lieut. Colonel Smith, April 18, 1775

Document 7

“He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.

He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harrass our people, and eat out their substance.

He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures.

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation:

For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.”

-Excerpts from the Declaration of Independence, adopted by the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776