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Teaching Processes, TWS Standards, & Indicators

Greenwood-Leflore Consolidated School District in Mississippi

(ONLY DO TP.1, TP 2, TP.3)

TP 1.  Contextual Factors

TWS Standard:  The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment.

Indicators:

  • Knowledge of community, school, and classroom factors
  • Knowledge of characteristics
  • Knowledge of students’ varied approaches to learning
  • Knowledge of students’ skills and prior learning
  • Implications for instructional planning and assessment

TP 2.  Learning Goals

TWS Standard: The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning goals.

Indicators:

  • Significance, Challenge and Variety
  • Clarity
  • Appropriateness for students
  • Alignment with national, state or local standards

TP 3.  Assessment Plan

TWS Standard:  The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction.

Indicators:

  • Alignment with learning goals and instruction
  • Clarity of criteria for performance
  • Multiple modes and approaches
  • Technical soundness
  • Adaptations based on the individual needs of students

TP 4.  Design for Instruction

TWS Standard:  The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

Indicators:

  • Alignment with learning goals
  • Accurate representation of content
  • Lesson and unit structure
  • Use of a variety of instruction, activities, assignments and resources
  • Use of contextual information and data to select appropriate and relevant activities, assignments and resources
  • Use of technology

TP 5.  Instructional Decision-Making

TWS Standard:  The teacher uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

Indicators:

  • Sound professional practice
  • Adjustments based on analysis of student learning
  • Congruence between modifications and learning goals

TP 6.  Analysis of Student Learning

TWS Standard:  The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

Indicators:

  • Clarity and accuracy of presentation
  • Alignment with learning goals
  • Interpretation of data
  • Evidence of impact on student learning

TP 7.  Reflection and Self-Evaluation

TWS Standard:  The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

Indicators:

  • Interpretation of student learning
  • Insights on effective instruction and assessment
  • Alignment among goals, instruction and assessment
  • Implications for future teaching
  • Implications for professional development

Teaching Processes, TWS Standards, & Indicators Greenwood-Leflore Consolidated School District in Mississippi (ONLY DO TP.1, TP 2, TP.3) TP 1. Contextual Factors TWS Standard: The teacher uses
Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process One Contextual Factors TWS Standard The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment. Task Discuss relevant factors and how they may affect the teaching-learning process. Include any supports and challenges that affect instruction and student learning. Directions In your discussion, include: Community, district and school factors. Address geographical location, community and school population, socio-economic profile and race/ethnicity. You might also address such things as stability of community, political climate, community support for education, and other environmental factors. Classroom factors. Address physical features, availability of technology equipment and resources and the extent of parental involvement. You might also discuss other relevant factors such as classroom rules and routines, grouping patterns, scheduling and classroom management. Student characteristics. Address student characteristics you must consider as you design instruction and assess learning. Include factors such as age, gender, race/ethnicity, special needs, achievement/development levels, culture, language, interests, learning styles/modalities or students’ skill levels. In your narrative, make sure you address students’ skills and prior learning that may influence the development of your learning goals, instruction and assessment. Instructional implications. Address how contextual characteristics of the community, classroom and students have implications for instructional planning assessment. Include specific instructional implications for at least two characteristics and any other factors that will influence how you plan and implement your unit. Suggested page Length: 1-2 Contextual Factors Rubric TWS Standard The teacher uses information about the learning/teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals, plan instruction and assess learning. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Knowledge of Community, School and Classroom Factors Teacher displays Minimal, irrelevant, or biased knowledge of the Characteristics of the community, school, and classroom. Teacher displays some Knowledge of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom that may affect learning. Teacher displays A comprehensive Understanding of the community, school, and classroom that may affect learning. Knowledge of Characteristics Of Students Teacher displays Minimal, stereotypical, or irrelevant knowledge of student differences (e.g. development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities). Teacher displays general knowledge of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities) that may affect learning. Teacher displays general & specific understanding of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities) that may affect learning. Knowledge of Students’ Varied Approaches to Learning Teacher displays minimal, stereotypical, or irrelevant knowledge about the different ways students learn (e.g., learning styles, learning modalities). Teacher displays general knowledge about the different ways students learn (e.g., learning styles, learning modalities). Teacher displays general & specific understanding of student different ways students learn (e.g., learning styles, learning modalities) that may affect learning. Knowledge Of Students’ Skills and Prior Learning Teacher displays little or irrelevant knowledge of students’ skills and prior learning. Teacher displays general knowledge of students’ skills and prior learning that may affect learning. Teacher displays general & specific understanding of students’ skills and prior learning that may affect learning. Implications For Instructional Planning and Assessment Teacher does not provide implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics OR provides inappropriate implications. Teacher provides general implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics. Teacher provides specific implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics. Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process Two Learning Goals PLEASE USE MISSISSIPPI Standard and Goals TWS Standard The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals. Task Select Learning Goals/Objs. Provide and justify the learning goals/obj. for the unit. Directions List the learning goals (not the activities) that will guide the planning, delivery and assessment of your unit. These goals should define what your expect students to know and be able to do at the end of the unit. The goals should be significant (reflect the big ideas or structure of the discipline) challenging, varied and appropriate. Number or code each learning goal so you can reference it later. Show how the goals are aligned with local, state, or national standards. (Identify the source of the standards). Describe the types and levels of your learning goals. Discuss why your learning goals/objectives are appropriate in terms of development; pre-requisite knowledge, skills; and other student needs. Suggested Page Length: 1-2 Learning Goals Rubric TWS Standard The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Significance, Challenge and Variety Goals reflect only one type or level of learning. Goals reflect several types or levels of learning but lack significance or challenge. Goals reflect several types or levels of learning and are significant and challenging. Clarity Goals are not stated clearly and are activities rather than learning outcomes. Some of the goals are clearly stated as learning outcomes. Most of the goals are clearly stated as learning outcomes. Appropriateness For Students Goals are not appropriate for the developmental level; pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences; or other student needs. Some goals are appropriate for the developmental level; pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences; and other student needs. Most goals are appropriate for the developmental level; pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences; and other student needs. Alignment with National, State, Or Local Standards Goals are not aligned with national, state or local standards. Some goals are aligned with national, state or local standards. Most of the goals are explicitly aligned with national, state or local standards. Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process Three Instructional Decision-Making TWS Standard. The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction. Task Provide two examples of instructional decision-making based on students’ learning or responses. Directions Provide an overview of the assessment plan. For each learning goal include: assessments used to judge student performance, format of each assessment, and adaptations of the assessments for the individual needs of students based on pre-assessment and contextual factors. The purpose of this overview is to depict the alignment between learning goals and assessments and to show adaptations to meet the individual needs of students or contextual factors. You may use a visual organizer such as a table, outline or other means to make your plan clear. Describe the pre- and post-assessments that are aligned with your learning goals. Clearly explain how you will evaluate or score pre- and post-assessments, including criteria you will use to determine if the students’ performance meets the learning goals. Include copies of assessments, prompts, and/or student directions and criteria for judging student performance (e.g., scoring rubrics, observation checklist, rating scales, item weights, test blueprint, answer key). Discuss you plan for formative assessment that will help you determine student progress during the unit. Describe the assessments you plan to use to check on student progress and comment on the importance of collecting that particular evidence. Although formative assessment may change as you are teaching the unit, your task here is to predict at what points in your teaching it will be important to assess students’ progress toward learning goals. Suggested Page Length: 2+ pre- and post-assessment instruments, scoring rubrics/keys, and assessment plan table Example of Assessment Plan Table: Kindergarten Learning Goals Assessments Format of Assessment Adaptations Learning Goal 1 Example: The students will link wild animals with Their habitats. Pre-Assessment Formative Assessment Post- Assessment Checklist: game with Animal masks & centers Representing habitats (tree, lake, burrow, cave) Animal puppets and habitats (e.g., bird and nest) anecdotal records RE Q & A picture journals Checklist: game with Animal masks & centers Representing habitats *Repeat and modify instructions, as needed. Demonstrate and assist with cutting, gluing, etc. Provide model of mask and model how to move to habitat centers. Keep all activities high-interest and brief. *Provide concrete models and assistance with fine motor tasks, as needed. Provide multiple explanations and model performances. Process writing (i.e., dictations) when needed. Provide verbal cues and plenty of wait time for Q & A. Assessment Plan Rubric TWS Standard The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Alignment with Learning Goals and Instruction Content and methods of assessment lack congruence with learning goals or lack cognitive complexity. Some of the learning goals are assessed through the assessment plan, but many are not congruent with learning goals in content and cognitive complexity. Each of the learning goals is assessed through the assessment plan; assessments are congruent with the learning goals in content and cognitive complexity. Clarity of Criteria and Standards for Performance The assessments contain no clear criteria for measuring student performance relative to the learning goals. Assessment criteria have been developed, but they are not clear or are not explicitly linked to the learning goals. Assessment criteria are clear and are explicitly linked to the learning goals. Multiple Modes and Approaches The assessment plan includes only one assessment mode and does not assess students before, during, and after instruction. The assessment plan includes multiple modes but all are either pencil/paper based (i.e. they are not performance assessments) and/or do not require the integration of knowledge, skills and reasoning ability. The assessment plan includes multiple assessment modes ( including performance assessments, lab reports, research projects, etc.) and assesses student performance throughout the instructional sequence. Technical Soundness Assessments are not valid; scoring procedures are absent or inaccurate; items or prompts are poorly written; directions and procedures are confusing to students. Assessments appear to have some validity. Some scoring procedures are explained; some items or prompts are clearly written; some directions and procedures are clear to students. Assessments appear to be valid; scoring procedures are explained; most items or prompts are clearly written; directions and procedures are clear to students. Adaptations Based on the Individual Needs of Students Teacher does not adapt assessments to meet the individual needs of students or these assessments are inappropriate. Teacher makes adaptations to assessments that are appropriate to meet the individual needs of some students. Teacher makes adaptations to assessments that are appropriate to meet the individual needs of most students.
Teaching Processes, TWS Standards, & Indicators Greenwood-Leflore Consolidated School District in Mississippi (ONLY DO TP.1, TP 2, TP.3) TP 1. Contextual Factors TWS Standard: The teacher uses
Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample (TWS) The Teacher Work Sample contains seven teaching processes identified by research and best practice as fundamental to improving student learning. Each Teaching Process is followed by a TWS Standard, the Task, directions, and a Rubric that defines various levels of performance on the standard. The Standards and Rubrics will be used to evaluate your TWS. The directions help you document the extent to which you have met the standard. You are required to teach a comprehensive unit. Before you teach the unit, you will describe contextual factors, identify learning goals based on your state or district content standards, create an assessment plan designed to measure student performance before (pre-assessment), and plan for your instruction. After you teach the unit, you will analyze student learning and then reflect and evaluate your teaching as related to student learning. TWS Format 1. Complete a cover page that includes: (a) your name, (b) date submitted, (c) grade level taught, (d) your university, (e) course number and title. 2. Provide a Table of Contents that lists the sections and attachments in your TWS document with page numbers. Be sure to number each page of the entire document. 3. Charts, graphs, and assessment instruments are required as part of the TWS document. You may also want to provide other attachments, such as student work. However you should be very selective and make sure your attachments provide clear, concise evidence of your performance related to TWS standards and your students’ learning progress. 4. A suggested page length for your narrative is given at the end of each component section. You have some flexibility of length across components, but the total length of your written narrative (excluding charts, graphs, attachments and references) should not exceed twenty (20) word-processed pages, double-spaced in 12 point font, with 1 inch margins. 5. If you referred to another person’s ideas or material in your narrative, you should cite these in a separate section at the end of your narrative under References and Credits (not included in total page length). You may use any standard form for references; however, the American Psychological Association (APA) style is a recommended format. 6. In order to insure the anonymity of students in your class, do not include any student names or identification in any part of your TWS. Teaching Processes, TWS Standards, & Indicators TP 1. Contextual Factors TWS Standard: The teacher uses information about the learning –teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment. Indicators: Knowledge of community, school, and classroom factors Knowledge of characteristics Knowledge of students’ varied approaches to learning Knowledge of students’ skills and prior learning Implications for instructional planning and assessment TP 2. Learning Goals TWS Standard: The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals. Indicators: Significance, Challenge and Variety Clarity Appropriateness for students Alignment with national, state or local standards TP 3. Assessment Plan TWS Standard: The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction. Indicators: Alignment with learning goals and instruction Clarity of criteria for performance Multiple modes and approaches Technical soundness Adaptations based on the individual needs of students TP 4. Design for Instruction TWS Standard: The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts. Indicators: Alignment with learning goals Accurate representation of content Lesson and unit structure Use of a variety of instruction, activities, assignments and resources Use of contextual information and data to select appropriate and relevant activities, assignments and resources Use of technology TP 5. Instructional Decision-Making TWS Standard: The teacher uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions. Indicators: Sound professional practice Adjustments based on analysis of student learning Congruence between modifications and learning goals TP 6. Analysis of Student Learning TWS Standard: The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement. Indicators: Clarity and accuracy of presentation Alignment with learning goals Interpretation of data Evidence of impact on student learning TP 7. Reflection and Self-Evaluation TWS Standard: The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice. Indicators: Interpretation of student learning Insights on effective instruction and assessment Alignment among goals, instruction and assessment Implications for future teaching Implications for professional development Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process One Contextual Factors TWS Standard The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment. Task Discuss relevant factors and how they may affect the teaching-learning process. Include any supports and challenges that affect instruction and student learning. Directions In your discussion, include: Community, district and school factors. Address geographical location, community and school population, socio-economic profile and race/ethnicity. You might also address such things as stability of community, political climate, community support for education, and other environmental factors. Classroom factors. Address physical features, availability of technology equipment and resources and the extent of parental involvement. You might also discuss other relevant factors such as classroom rules and routines, grouping patterns, scheduling and classroom management. Student characteristics. Address student characteristics you must consider as you design instruction and assess learning. Include factors such as age, gender, race/ethnicity, special needs, achievement/development levels, culture, language, interests, learning styles/modalities or students’ skill levels. In your narrative, make sure you address students’ skills and prior learning that may influence the development of your learning goals, instruction and assessment. Instructional implications. Address how contextual characteristics of the community, classroom and students have implications for instructional planning assessment. Include specific instructional implications for at least two characteristics and any other factors that will influence how you plan and implement your unit. Suggested page Length: 1-2 Contextual Factors Rubric TWS Standard The teacher uses information about the learning/teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals, plan instruction and assess learning. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Knowledge of Community, School and Classroom Factors Teacher displays Minimal, irrelevant, or biased knowledge of the Characteristics of the community, school, and classroom. Teacher displays some Knowledge of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom that may affect learning. Teacher displays A comprehensive Understanding of the community, school, and classroom that may affect learning. Knowledge of Characteristics Of Students Teacher displays Minimal, stereotypical, or irrelevant knowledge of student differences (e.g. development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities). Teacher displays general knowledge of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities) that may affect learning. Teacher displays general & specific understanding of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities) that may affect learning. Knowledge of Students’ Varied Approaches to Learning Teacher displays minimal, stereotypical, or irrelevant knowledge about the different ways students learn (e.g., learning styles, learning modalities). Teacher displays general knowledge about the different ways students learn (e.g., learning styles, learning modalities). Teacher displays general & specific understanding of student different ways students learn (e.g., learning styles, learning modalities) that may affect learning. Knowledge Of Students’ Skills and Prior Learning Teacher displays little or irrelevant knowledge of students’ skills and prior learning. Teacher displays general knowledge of students’ skills and prior learning that may affect learning. Teacher displays general & specific understanding of students’ skills and prior learning that may affect learning. Implications For Instructional Planning and Assessment Teacher does not provide implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics OR provides inappropriate implications. Teacher provides general implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics. Teacher provides specific implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics. Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process Two Learning Goals TWS Standard The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals. Task Select Learning Goals/Objs. Provide and justify the learning goals/obj. for the unit. Directions List the learning goals (not the activities) that will guide the planning, delivery and assessment of your unit. These goals should define what your expect students to know and be able to do at the end of the unit. The goals should be significant (reflect the big ideas or structure of the discipline) challenging, varied and appropriate. Number or code each learning goal so you can reference it later. Show how the goals are aligned with local, state, or national standards. (Identify the source of the standards). Describe the types and levels of your learning goals. Discuss why your learning goals/objectives are appropriate in terms of development; pre-requisite knowledge, skills; and other student needs. Suggested Page Length: 1-2 Learning Goals Rubric TWS Standard The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Significance, Challenge and Variety Goals reflect only one type or level of learning. Goals reflect several types or levels of learning but lack significance or challenge. Goals reflect several types or levels of learning and are significant and challenging. Clarity Goals are not stated clearly and are activities rather than learning outcomes. Some of the goals are clearly stated as learning outcomes. Most of the goals are clearly stated as learning outcomes. Appropriateness For Students Goals are not appropriate for the developmental level; pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences; or other student needs. Some goals are appropriate for the developmental level; pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences; and other student needs. Most goals are appropriate for the developmental level; pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences; and other student needs. Alignment with National, State, Or Local Standards Goals are not aligned with national, state or local standards. Some goals are aligned with national, state or local standards. Most of the goals are explicitly aligned with national, state or local standards. Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process Three Instructional Decision-Making TWS Standard. The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction. Task Provide two examples of instructional decision-making based on students’ learning or responses. Directions Provide an overview of the assessment plan. For each learning goal include: assessments used to judge student performance, format of each assessment, and adaptations of the assessments for the individual needs of students based on pre-assessment and contextual factors. The purpose of this overview is to depict the alignment between learning goals and assessments and to show adaptations to meet the individual needs of students or contextual factors. You may use a visual organizer such as a table, outline or other means to make your plan clear. Describe the pre- and post-assessments that are aligned with your learning goals. Clearly explain how you will evaluate or score pre- and post-assessments, including criteria you will use to determine if the students’ performance meets the learning goals. Include copies of assessments, prompts, and/or student directions and criteria for judging student performance (e.g., scoring rubrics, observation checklist, rating scales, item weights, test blueprint, answer key). Discuss you plan for formative assessment that will help you determine student progress during the unit. Describe the assessments you plan to use to check on student progress and comment on the importance of collecting that particular evidence. Although formative assessment may change as you are teaching the unit, your task here is to predict at what points in your teaching it will be important to assess students’ progress toward learning goals. Suggested Page Length: 2+ pre- and post-assessment instruments, scoring rubrics/keys, and assessment plan table Example of Assessment Plan Table: Kindergarten Learning Goals Assessments Format of Assessment Adaptations Learning Goal 1 Example: The students will link wild animals with Their habitats. Pre-Assessment Formative Assessment Post- Assessment Checklist: game with Animal masks & centers Representing habitats (tree, lake, burrow, cave) Animal puppets and habitats (e.g., bird and nest) anecdotal records RE Q & A picture journals Checklist: game with Animal masks & centers Representing habitats *Repeat and modify instructions, as needed. Demonstrate and assist with cutting, gluing, etc. Provide model of mask and model how to move to habitat centers. Keep all activities high-interest and brief. *Provide concrete models and assistance with fine motor tasks, as needed. Provide multiple explanations and model performances. Process writing (i.e., dictations) when needed. Provide verbal cues and plenty of wait time for Q & A. Assessment Plan Rubric TWS Standard The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Alignment with Learning Goals and Instruction Content and methods of assessment lack congruence with learning goals or lack cognitive complexity. Some of the learning goals are assessed through the assessment plan, but many are not congruent with learning goals in content and cognitive complexity. Each of the learning goals is assessed through the assessment plan; assessments are congruent with the learning goals in content and cognitive complexity. Clarity of Criteria and Standards for Performance The assessments contain no clear criteria for measuring student performance relative to the learning goals. Assessment criteria have been developed, but they are not clear or are not explicitly linked to the learning goals. Assessment criteria are clear and are explicitly linked to the learning goals. Multiple Modes and Approaches The assessment plan includes only one assessment mode and does not assess students before, during, and after instruction. The assessment plan includes multiple modes but all are either pencil/paper based (i.e. they are not performance assessments) and/or do not require the integration of knowledge, skills and reasoning ability. The assessment plan includes multiple assessment modes ( including performance assessments, lab reports, research projects, etc.) and assesses student performance throughout the instructional sequence. Technical Soundness Assessments are not valid; scoring procedures are absent or inaccurate; items or prompts are poorly written; directions and procedures are confusing to students. Assessments appear to have some validity. Some scoring procedures are explained; some items or prompts are clearly written; some directions and procedures are clear to students. Assessments appear to be valid; scoring procedures are explained; most items or prompts are clearly written; directions and procedures are clear to students. Adaptations Based on the Individual Needs of Students Teacher does not adapt assessments to meet the individual needs of students or these assessments are inappropriate. Teacher makes adaptations to assessments that are appropriate to meet the individual needs of some students. Teacher makes adaptations to assessments that are appropriate to meet the individual needs of most students. Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process Four Design for Instruction TWS Standard The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts. Task Describe how you will design your unit instruction related to unit goals, students’ characteristics and needs, and the specific learning context. Directions Results of pre-assessment. After administrating the pre-assessment, analyze student performance relative to the learning goals. Depict the results of the pore-assessment in a format that allows you to find patterns of student performance. Unit overview. Provide an overview of your unit. Use a visual organizer such as a block plan or outline to make your unit plan clear. Include the topic or activity you are planning for each day/period. Also indicate the goal or goals (coded from your Learning Goals section) that you are addressing in each activity. Make sure that every goal is addressed by at least one activity and that every activity relates to at least one goal. Activities. Describe at least three unit activities that reflect a variety of instructional strategies/techniques and explain why you are planning those specific activities. In your explanation for each activity, include: (1) how the content relates to your instructional goal(s), (2) how the activity stems from your pre-assessment information and contextual factors, (3) what materials/technology you will need to implement the activity, and (4) how you plan to assess student learning during and/or following the activity (i.e., formative assessment). Technology. Describe how you will use technology in your planning and/or instruction. If you do not plan to use any form of technology, provide your clear rationale for its omission. Suggested Page Length: 3 + visual organizer Design for Instruction Rubric TWS Standard The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, students characteristics and needs, and learning contexts. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Alignment with Learning Goals Few lessons are explicitly linked to learning goals. Few learning activities, assignments and resources are aligned with learning goals. Not all learning goals are covered in the design. Most lessons are explicitly linked to learning goals. Most learning activities, assignments and resources are aligned with learning goals. Most learning goals are covered in the design. All lessons are explicitly linked to learning goals. All learning activities, assignments and resources are aligned with learning goals. All learning goals are covered in the design. Accurate Representation of Content Teacher’s use of content appears to contain numerous inaccuracies. Content seems to be viewed more as isolated skills and facts rather than as part of a larger conceptual structure. Teacher’s use of content appears to be mostly accurate. Shows some awareness of the big ideas or structure of the discipline. Teacher’s use of content appears to be accurate. Focus of the content is congruent with the big ideas or structure of the discipline. Lesson and Unit Structure The lessons with9n the unit are not logically organized organization (e.g., sequenced). The lessons within the unit have some logical organization and appear to be somewhat useful in moving students toward achieving the learning goals. All lessons within the unit are logically organized and appear to be useful in moving students toward achieving the learning goals. Use of a Variety of Instruction, Activities, Assignments and Resources Little variety of instruction, activities, assignments, and resources. Heavy reliance on textbook or single resource (e.g., work sheets). Some variety in instruction, activities, assignments, or resources but with limited contribution to learning. Significant variety across instruction, activities, assignments, and/or resources. This variety makes a clear contribution to learning. Use of Contextual Information and Data to Select Appropriate and Relevant Activities, Assignments and Resources Instruction has not been designed with reference to contextual factors and pre-assessment data. Activities and assignments do not appear productive and appropriate for each student. Some instruction has been designed with reference to contextual factors and pre-assessment data. Some activities and assignments appear productive and appropriate for each student. Most instruction has been designed with reference to contextual factors and pre-assessment data. Most activities and assignments appear productive and appropriate for each student. Use of Technology Technology is inappropriately used OR teacher does not use technology, and no (or inappropriate) rationale is provided. Teacher uses technology but it does not make a significant contribution to teaching and learning OR teacher provides limited rationale for not using technology. Teacher integrates appropriate technology that makes a significant contribution to teaching and learning OR provides a strong rationale for not using technology. Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process Five Instructional Decision-Making TWS Standard The teacher uses on-going analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions. Task Provide two examples of instructional decision-making based on students’ learning or responses. Directions Think of a time during your unit when a student’s learning or response caused you to modify your original design for instruction. (The resulting modification may affect other students as well.) Cite specific evidence to support your answers to the following: 1. Describe the student’s learning or response that caused you to rethink your plans. The student’s learning or response may come from a planned formative assessment or another source (not the pre-assessment). 2. Describe what you did next and explain why you thought this would improve student progress toward the learning goal. Now think of one more time during your unit when another student’s learning or response caused you to modify a different portion of your original design for instruction. (The resulting modification may affect other students as well.) Cite specific evidence to support your answers to the following: (1) Describe the student’s learning or response that caused you to rethink your plans. The student’s learning or response may come from a planned formative assessment or another source (not the pre-assessment). (2) Describe what you did next and explain why you thought this would improve student progress toward the learning goal. Suggested Page Length: 3-4 Instructional Decision-Making Rubric TWS Standard The teacher uses on-going analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Sound Professional Practice Many instructional decisions are inappropriate and not pedagogically sound. Instructional decisions are mostly appropriate, but some decisions are not pedagogically sound. Most instructional decisions are pedagogically sound (i.e., they are likely to lead to student learning). Modifications Based on Analysis of Student Learning Teacher treats class as “one plan fits all” with no modifications. Some modifications of the instructional plan are made to address individual student needs, but these are not based on the analysis of student learning, bust practice, or contextual factors. Appropriate modifications of the instructional plan are made to address individual student needs, These modifications are informed by the analysis of student learning/performance, best practice, or contextual factors. Include explanation of why the modifications would improve student progress. Congruence Between Modifications and Learning Goals Modifications in instruction lack congruence with learning goals. Modifications in instruction are somewhat congruent with learning goals. Modifications in instruction are congruent with learning goals. Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process Six Analysis of Student Learning TWS Standard The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement. Task Analyze your assessment data, including pre-/post- assessments and formative assessments to determine students’ progress related to the unit learning goals. Use visual representations and narrative to communicate the performance of the whole class, subgroups, and two individual students. Conclusions drawn from this analysis should be provided in the “Reflection and Self Evaluation” section. Directions In this section, you will analyze data to explain progress and achievement toward learning goals demonstrated by your whole class, subgroups of students, and individual students. Whole class. To analyze the progress of your whole class, create a table that shows pre- and post-assessment data on every student on every learning goal. Then, create a graphic summary that shows the extent to which your students make progress (from pre- to post-) toward the learning criterion that you identified for each learning goal (identified in your Assessment Plan section). Summarize what the graph tells you about your students’ learning in this unit (i.e., the number of students met the criterion). Subgroups. Select a group characteristic (e.g., gender, performance level, socio-economic status, language proficiency) to analyze in terms of one learning goal. Provide a rational for your selection of this characteristic to form subgroups (e.g., girls vs. boys; high vs. middle vs. low performers). Create a graphic representation that compares pre- and post-assessment results for the subgroups on this learning goal. Summarize what these data show about student learning. Individuals. Select two students that demonstrated different levels of performance. Explain why it is important to understand the learning of these particular students. Use pre-, formative, and post-assessment data with examples of the students’ work to draw conclusions about the extent to which these students attained the two learning goals. Graphic representatives are not necessary for this subsection. Suggested Page Length: 4 + charts and student work examples Analysis of Student Learning Rubric TWS Standard The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Interpretation of Student Learning No evidence or reasons provided to support conclusions drawn in “Analysis of Student Learning” sections. Provides evidence but no (or simplistic, superficial) reasons or hypotheses to support conclusions drawn in “Analysis of Student Learning” sections. Uses evidence to support conclusions drawn in “Analysis of Student Learning” section. Explores multiple hypotheses for why some students did not meet learning goals. Insights on Effective Instruction and Assessment Provides no rationale for why some activities or assessments were more successful than others Identifies successful and unsuccessful activities or assessments and superficially explores reasons for their success. Identifies successful and unsuccessful activities and assessments and provides plausible reasons (based on theory or research) for their success or lack thereof. Alignment Among Goals, Instruction and Assessment Does not connect learning goals, instruction, and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction and/or the connections are irrelevant or inaccurate Connects learning goals, instruction, and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction, but misunderstandings or conceptual gaps are present. Logically connects learning goals, instructions, and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction. Implications for Future Teaching Provides no ideas or inappropriate ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment. Provides ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment but offers no rationale for why these changes would improve student learning. Provides ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment and explains why these modifications would improve student learning. Implications for Professional Development Provides no professional learning goals or goals that are not related to the insights and experiences described in this section. Presents professional learning goals that are not strongly related to the insights and experiences described in this section and/or provides a vague plan for meeting the goals. Presents a small number of professional learning goals that clearly emerge from the insights and experiences described in this section. Describes specific steps to meet these goals. Mississippi Valley State University Teacher Work Sample Teaching Process Seven Reflection and Self-Evaluation TWS Standard The teacher analyzes the relationship between his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice. Task Reflect on your performance as a teacher and link your performance to student learning results. Evaluate your performance and identify future actions for improved practice and professional growth. Directions Select the learning goal where your students were most successful. Provide two or more possible reasons for this success. Consider your goals, instruction, and assessment along with student characteristics and other contextual factors under your control. Select the learning goal where your students were least successful. Provide two or more possible reasons for this lack of success. Consider your goals, instruction, and assessment along with student characteristics and other contextual factors under your control. Discuss what you could do differently or better in the future to improve your students’ performance. Reflection on possibilities for professional development. Describe at least two professional learning goals that emerged from your insights and experiences with the TWS. Identify two specific steps you will take to improve your performance in the critical area(s) you identified. Suggested Page Length: 2 Reflection and Self-Evaluation Rubric TWS Standard The teacher analyzes the relationship between his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice. Rating Indicator 1 Indicator Not Met 2 Indicator Partially Met 3 Indicator Met Score Interpretation Of Student Learning No evidence or reasons provided to support conclusions drawn in “Analysis of Student Learning” section. Provides evidence but no (or simplistic, superficial) reasons or hypotheses to support conclusions drawn in “Analysis of Student Learning” section. Uses evidence to support conclusions drawn in “Analysis of Student Learning” section. Explores multiple hypotheses for why some students did not meet learning goals. Insights on Effective Instruction and Assessment Provides no rationale for why some activities or assessments were more successful than others. Identifies successful and unsuccessful activities or assessments and superficially explores reasons for their success or lack thereof (no use of theory or research) Identifies successful and unsuccessful activities and assessments and provides plausible reasons (based on theory or research) for their success or lack thereof. Alignment Among Goals, Instruction and Assessment Does not connect learning goals, instruction, and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction and/or the connections are irrelevant or inaccurate. Connects learning goals, instruction, and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction, but misunderstandings or conceptual gaps are present. Logically connects learning goals, instruction, assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction. Implications for Future Teaching Provides no ideas or inappropriate ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment. Provides ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment but offers no rationale for why these changes would improve student learning. Provides ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment and explains why these modifications would improve student learning. Implications for Professional Development Provides no professional learning goals or goals that are not related to the insights and experiences described in this section. Presents professional learning goals that arte not strongly related to the insights and experiences described in this section and/or provides a vague plan for meeting the goals. Presents a small number of professional learning goals that clearly emerge from the insights and experiences described in this section. Describes specific steps to meet these goals. MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY Teacher Work Sample Rubric and Scoring Guide Teacher Candidate: ____________________________ I.D. Number: ________________ Grade/Subject: ________________________________ Date: ______________________ Evaluator: _______________________________________________________________ Skill Unacceptable (1) Acceptable (2) Target (3) 1. Student Information Student information is missing or incomplete Student information is included and is correct. There may be minor information missing. All necessary information is included in the Student section of the Plan. 2. Lesson Plan Goals Goals are missing or incomplete. Goals are included, but may not completely cover all areas of the lesson plan needing to be adapted. Goals are well-written, clear, and easy to understand. All important areas of the need for adaptation are included. 3. Student Learning Experience/ history and description of behaviors Description of classroom situation is incomplete or missing. Candidate explains and describes students’ behaviors and setting, but does not describe clearly enough for others to see the existing problems. Candidate clearly describes setting, student’s behavior, and interactions with other students and clearly defines problematic behavior in the setting. 4. Identify And Prioritize problems Behaviors are not clearly defines nor has attention been given to clearly identifying problem behaviors. All behaviors are not listed. Behaviors are defined, but lacking in depth in the prioritization of problems. Prioritization indicates a lack of clear understanding of the contributing factors of the problem. Behaviors are clearly defined, depth exists in the discussion of the problem behaviors and their prioritization. A clear idea of how the plan will be utilized to improve instruction is included. 5. Identify Target behaviors and domains Target behaviors are either missing or do not reflect the cited prioritized problems. Target behaviors are valid and do reflect the prioritized problems, however, target behaviors are not the most effective. Target behaviors clearly are linked to the problems cited in the prioritized problem and are identified as being in a logical and coherent order for solving the cited problems. 6. Intervention Choice of intervention is not appropriate for the target behavior or does not clearly address the problem. Choice of intervention is appropriate for the target behavior and logically addresses the stated problems. Some problems exist as to the clarity of the expressed intervention. Choice of intervention is clearly the best choice for the target behavior. Other interventions logically follow after the initial intervention and are clearly linked to problem behaviors. 7. Assessment and Assessment Results Assessments are not appropriately administered or chosen for this target behavior or problem. Assessment may be incorrectly used for what it is measuring. Assessments are appropriately administered and selected for this target behavior. Assessment adequately measures what it is selected to measure and yields an appropriate outcome for giving information related to the target behavior and intervention. Assessments are appropriately administered and selected for the target behavior. The assessment yields the desired results that allows the candidate to make well-informed decisions about planning and carrying out the adaptive instruction. 8. Action Plan including resources and materials and secondary assessment Action plan is weak and does not include appropriate resources and materials, nor does it include realistic or valid secondary assessment. One or more items may be missing that should have contributed to the plan’s success. Action plan is adequate in including explanations, appropriate resources and materials, and realistic secondary assessment plans. Most of the items are included and any omissions are minimal. Action plan is designed for success and includes appropriate explanations, resources, materials, and secondary assessment plans. All items are included and fulfill the planned outcome. 9. Evaluation and Interpretation Evaluation and Interpretation are unclear and do not actually relate to the targeted behaviors or action plan. Evaluation and interpretation, although they lack depth, do address the targeted behaviors and action plans. Outcomes are clearly presented in a coherent manner and it is evident that some improvement has occurred. Evaluation and interpretation of the outcomes is clearly defined based on assessment data and demonstrate specific content that has been learned by the student. The explanation is clearly and concisely written and includes all necessary components. 10. Student Learning Outcomes Student outcomes are either not included or are poorly stated. Student outcomes are clearly described and appropriate evidence is available. Student outcomes are clearly stated, documented by work samples and assessment data and indicate what objectives have been met by the adaptive instructional plan. 26